How to be a responsible steward of Democracy, Human Rights Capitalism and Planet Earth.



How to be a responsible steward of Planet Earth.

Monday, September 25, 2017

The Hollow Men: What the end of the world looks like...



What the end of the world looks like...




The Hollow Men

This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.

by T. S. Eliot Written 1925





 

Saturday, July 8, 2017

JFK flights were delayed because of turtles taking over the runway



JFK flights were delayed because of turtles taking over the runway


The turtles have ben crossing the airport since 2011 to gt to sand marsh breeding grounds...


Turtles Delay Flights At JFK Airport With Mating Ritual

Diamond terrapins love the JFK Airport runways. Tens of thousands of terrapins live in Jamaica Bay. This is the time of year some of them wind up on the runway at Kennedy Airport. They make their way out of Jamaica Bay in search of place to lay their eggs. The sandy area of the outskirts of the runway right next to the water has proven a popular spot.

Published on Jun 29, 2011
More than 100 turtles crossing the tarmac interrupt New York's busiest airport. For more, click here: http://abcn.ws/lwUI7G





We've been on the tarmac for two hours...




JFK Runway Becomes Turtle Crossing


More than 100 turtles crossing the tarmac interrupt New York's busiest airport. For more, click here: http://abcn.ws/lwUI7G




Sunday, May 7, 2017

France REJECTED Fascism

null
Unlike USA in its presidential election, France REJECTED fascism in theirs. Congratulations Emmanuel Macron! Viva la France

The Endangered Species Act threatnd by Feds


Bald Eagle. Photo: Don Berman/Audubon Photography Awards
The Endangered Species Act brought Bald Eagles back from the brink of extinction.



Watch a Sneaky Roadrunner Nab a Hummingbird While It's Feeding

A California photographer managed to capture the rarely documented behavior in his own backyard.





Don't Let Congress Dismantle the Endangered Species Act
 


 
Congress is moving quickly to gut the Endangered Species Act, America’s strongest and most important law for protecting wildlife. 

The Endangered Species Act has a proven track record of success in providing a safety net that protects our most vulnerable wildlife. It has prevented 99 percent of the species under its care from going extinct, including America's symbol, the Bald Eagle. We should allow this critical law to continue to protect wildlife for future generations, not undermine it.

Please ask your members of Congress to oppose efforts to weaken the Endangered Species Act.

Photo: Don Berman/Audubon Photography Awards

LWCF has helped protect forest habitat for Golden-winged Warblers in North Carolina.

American Golden-Plover. Photo: Milo Burcham
American Golden-Plovers are among the more than 200 bird species that depend on the pristine habitat in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.


en.wikipedia.org  
The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA) was signed on December 28, 1973, and provides for the conservation of species that are endangered or threatened throughout all or a significant portion of their range, and the conservation of the ecosystems on which they depend.


Source: http://www.audubon.org/
http://www.audubon.org/news/whoa-watch-sneaky-roadrunner-nab-hummingbird-while-its-feeding



Saturday, May 6, 2017

Mexican wolves in New Mxico

Latest: Mexican wolves are about to get wild

An appeal court ruling allows wolves more room to roam in New Mexico.

Friday, May 5, 2017

How hundreds of tons of plastic trash end up in Arctic Ocean

A seal lies on an iceberg in front of the research vessel Tara.
A seal lies on an iceberg in front of the research vessel Tara. (Anna Deniaud / Tara Expeditions Foundation)
 

 
Although the world’s other ocean “garbage patches” are significantly larger than the plastic accumulation in the Arctic, the average concentrations of plastic found there were comparable to those found in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans.

In a 2014 study, Cózar and his team estimated those oceans contain 10,000 to 35,000 tons of plastic pollution, which almost never fully decomposes on its own. Their latest findings suggest 3% of that global total is floating in the Arctic.
 
 
 
Source: http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-arctic-plastic-pollution-20170502-htmlstory.html#nws=true