How to be a responsible steward of Democracy, Human Rights Capitalism and Planet Earth.



How to be a responsible steward of Planet Earth.

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Following Complaints From Gulf, Congress Seeks Audit of BP Oil Spill Fund | NationofChange

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Money is inedible



Only after the last tree has been cut

Only after the last river has been poisoned

Only after the last fish has been caught

Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten

~ Cree Indian Prophecy ~


Thursday, October 20, 2011

Quotations



"The difference between an ordeal and an adventure is your attitude."

"You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something in your life."
- Winston Churchill.

OccupyWallStreet: The Real Tea Party

OccupyWallStreet: The Real Tea Party | NationofChange:

"The Occupy Wall Street crew picks up on the Tea Party anger directed at the use of the government to make the rich even richer"


The Tea Party movement had its origins in the anti-TARP protests in the fall of 2008. Millions of people across the country were outraged that the government was going to loan hundreds of billions of dollars to the banks that had brought themselves and the country to the brink of ruin through their own greed and incompetence. Just as these people feared, the bailouts saved the banks, leaving their high-flying executives largely unharmed, but did little to get the economy back on its feet.



Writer:
Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He previously worked as a senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute and an assistant professor at Bucknell University. He is the author of several books, including Plunder & Blunder: The Rise and Fall of the Bubble Economy, The ...


Jody Williams

Source:





http://nobelwomensinitiative.org/meet-the-laureates/jody-williams/


Jody Williams received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for herwork to ban landmines through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which shared the Peace Prize with her that year. At that time, she became the 10th woman – and third American woman—in its almost 100-year history to receive the Prize. Since her protests of the Vietnam War, she has been a life-long advocate of freedom, self-determination and human and civil rights.


Like others who’ve seen the ravages of war, she’s an outspoken peace activist who struggles to reclaim the real meaning of peace—a concept which goes far beyond the absence of armed conflict and is defined by human security, not national security. Williams believes that working for peace is not for the faint of heart. It requires dogged persistence and a commitment to sustainable peace, built on sustainable development, environmental justice and security, and meeting the basic needs of the majority of people on our planet.
Since January of 2006, Jody Williams has worked to achieve her peace work through the Nobel Women’s Initiative, which she chairs. Along with sister Laureate Dr. Shirin Ebadi of Iran, she took the lead in establishing the Nobel Women’s Initiative, and was joined by sister Laureates Wangari Maathai (Kenya), Rigoberta Menchu Tum (Guatemala) and Betty Williams and Mairead Maguire (Northern Ireland). Its mission is to use the prestige and access afforded by the Nobel Prize to spotlight and promote efforts of women’s rights activists, researchers and organizations working to advance peace, justice and equality for women. By helping to advance the cause of women, the Nobel Women’s Initiative advances all of humanity.

In February-March 2007, Williams lead a contentious High Level Mission on Darfur for the UN’s Human Rights Council. She presented the Mission’s hard-hitting report to the Council in March of that year and continues to be actively involved in work related to stopping the war in Darfur.

Since February 1998, Williams has also served as a Campaign Ambassador for the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. Beginning in early 1992 with two non-governmental organizations and a staff of one – Jody Williams, she oversaw the Campaign’s growth to over 1,300 organizations in 95 countries working to eliminate antipersonnel landmines. In an unprecedented cooperative effort with governments, UN bodies and the International Committee of the Red Cross, she served as a chief strategist and spokesperson for the ICBL as it dramatically achieved its goal of an international treaty banning antipersonnel landmines during a diplomatic conference held in Oslo in September 1997.

In 2003, Williams was named Distinguished Visiting Professor of Global Justice, in the Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston. In 2007 she was appointed the “Sam and Cele Keeper Endowed Professor in Peace and Social Justice.” The Graduate College of Social Work also houses an office of the Nobel Women’s Initiative, which is headquartered in Ottawa, Canada. That office offers internships with the Nobel Women’s Initiative for students of the College.

Prior to beginning the ICBL, Williams worked for eleven years to build public awareness about U.S. policy toward Central America. From 1986 to 1992, she developed and directed humanitarian relief projects as the deputy director of the Los Angeles-based Medical Aid for El Salvador. From 1984 to 1986, she was co-coordinator of the Nicaragua-Honduras Education Project, leading fact-finding delegations to the region. Previously, she taught English as a Second Language (ESL) in Mexico, the United Kingdom, and Washington, D.C.

Williams continues to be recognized for her contributions to human rights and global security. She is the recipient of fifteen honorary degrees, among other recognitions. In 2004, Williams was named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most powerful women in the worldin the publication of its first such annual list.

A prolific writer, her works are too numerous to list individually. Her articles have appeared in magazines and newspapers around the world – including The Wall Street Journal, The International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, The Toronto Globe & Mail, The Irish Times, The LA Times, to name just a few. She has contributed various chapters to countless books, including to works edited by Walter Cronkite and by Eve Ensler. She co-authored an early book on the landmine crisis. Her most recent book, Banning Landmines: Disarmament, Citizen Diplomacy and Human Security, edited with Steve Goose and Mary Wareham and released in March 2008, analyzes the Mine Ban Treaty and its impact on other human security-related issues. She is currently working on a memoir related to her work for social justice.
Nobel Peace Prize
International Campaign to Ban Landmines
Jody's ICBL Page

Movie 00 Jody Williams - YouTube

Movie 00 Jody Williams - YouTube: ""

'via Blog this'

Monday, October 10, 2011

Be Present In Your Life.


Tuesday, October 4, 2011

If children are considered the future, why the smoking?

For Chinese Students, Smoking Isn’t All Bad - Businessweek:

"In dozens of rural villages in China’s western provinces, one of the first things primary school kids learn is what helps make their education possible: tobacco. The schools are sponsored by local units of China’s state-owned cigarette monopoly, China National Tobacco. “On the gates of these schools you’ll see slogans that say ‘Genius comes from hard work—tobacco helps you become talented,’” says Xu Guihua, secretary general of the Chinese Association on Tobacco Control, a privately funded lobbying group. “They are pinning their hopes on young people taking up smoking.”

Anti-tobacco groups say efforts in China to reduce sales... "

Chinese kids smoking on the outskirts of Shaoyang in Hunan province
'via Blog this'



Monday, October 3, 2011

Compassion for all living things needs to be practiced to save our Planet...

Jane Goodall


‎"AND IF WE DARE TO LOOK INTO THOSE EYES, THEN WE SHALL FEEL THEIR SUFFERING IN OUR HEARTS.

MORE AND MORE PEOPLE HAVE SEEN THAT APPEAL AND FELT IT IN THEIR HEARTS.

ALL AROUND THE WORLD THERE IS AN AWAKENING OF UNDERSTANDING AND COMPASSION, AND UNDERSTANDING THAT REACHES OUT TO HELP THE SUFFERING ANIMALS IN THEIR VANISHING HOMELANDS.

THAT EMBRACES HUNGRY, SICK, AND DESPERATE HUMAN BEINGS, PEOPLE WHO ARE STARVING WHILE THE FORTUNATE AMONG US HAVE SO MUCH MORE THAN WE NEED.

AND IF, ONE BY ONE, WE HELP THEM, THE HURTING ANIMALS, THE DESPERATE HUMANS, THEN TOGETHER WE SHALL ALLEVIATE SO MUCH OF THE HUNGER, FEAR, AND PAIN IN THE WORLD.

TOGETHER WE CAN BRING CHANGE TO THE WORLD, GRADUALLY REPLACING FEAR AND HATRED WITH COMPASSION AND LOVE. LOVE FOR ALL LIVING BEINGS."



                     


If you don't see our "shared something" in his eyes, look again.